Archive for the ‘Department of Labor’ Category

Labor Secretary Nominee Puzder Withdraws from Consideration

Update:  President Trump has nominated R. Alexander Acosta for Labor Secretary following the withdrawal of Andrew Puzder.  Mr. Acosta is a former United States Attorney and served as Commissioner on the National Labor Relations Board during the George W. Bush Administration.  He is currently Dean of Florida International University Law School.  Original Post: President Trump’s nominee […]

 

The Employment Law Horizon – What does 2017 hold for employers?

There has been no shortage of prognostication and opinion as to how the new Trump Administration will alter the legal landscape in numerous areas. Here, we look at five ways employers may be impacted as the new Administration begins to put its stamp on federal regulations and agencies that most impact employment law. The Future […]

 

2016 Virginia Employment Law Pocket Guide

Sands Anderson’s Employment Law Team has released the 2016 Virginia Employment Law Pocket Guide. The guide provides summaries of key Virginia employment statutes and principles of employment law. The summaries are not intended to be a comprehensive analysis of the laws and/or their judicial interpretations. The materials in this Pocket Guide reflect the statutes in effect on July […]

 

Employee Misclassification Continues to Make News

Just last month, GrubHub, DoorDash, and Caviar were sued in San Francisco Superior Court in lawsuits similar to those pending cases against Uber and Lyft. These three new lawsuits ask the hot-button question: are workers in the shared economy employees improperly classified as independent contractors? If the current individuals working for these three shared economy […]

 

Independent Contractor or Employee: Do You Pass the “Economic Realities” Test?

In the first Administrator’s Interpretation issued in more than a year, the Department of Labor has recently weighed in on the debate over the misclassification of employees—a  debate that has been stirred up of late by companies such as Uber, Lyft, and the now closed Homejoy. “Although independent contracting relationships can be advantageous for workers and […]

 

Hold on to Your Collars: Overtime Changes to White Collar Exemptions are Coming under the Fair Labor Standards Act

On June 30, 2015, the United States Department of Labor issued the long-anticipated Proposed Rulemaking to update the regulations governing which “white collar workers”— executive, administrative, and professional employees — are entitled to minimum wage and overtime pay pursuant to the Fair Labor Standards Act. If implemented as proposed, early estimates indicate that over 5 […]