Archive for the ‘National Labor Relations Board’ Category

The Employment Law Horizon – What does 2017 hold for employers?

There has been no shortage of prognostication and opinion as to how the new Trump Administration will alter the legal landscape in numerous areas. Here, we look at five ways employers may be impacted as the new Administration begins to put its stamp on federal regulations and agencies that most impact employment law. The Future […]

 

NLRB Continues to Allow Certain Rude and Aggressive Employee Behavior as Protected Concerted Activity

The National Labor Relations Board continues to scrutinize employer personnel decisions and workplace policies that arguably trigger the protections of § 7 of the National Labor Relations Act. Recall that this section of the Act guarantees employees “the right to self-organization, to form, join, or assist labor organizations, to bargain collectively through representatives of their […]

 

Another Exception to Employment At-Will

Virginia is known as a stalwart adherent to the doctrine of employment at-will.  The courts in Virginia have long recognized that the employment relationship is for an indefinite term and may be terminated for any reason or no reason, at any time, with or without cause or notice.  This right, known as employment at-will, can […]

 

Two New Employer Requirements!

NLRA Poster. No later than April 30, 2012, most private sector employers will be required to post a notice advising employees of their rights under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). The notice, Notice of Employee Rights Under the National Labor Relations Act, is available for downloading at www.nlrb.gov.

 

THE NLRB POSTER Much Ado About Nothing or a Sea Change in Employee Relations?

As has been widely reported, The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) issued a final rule on August 25, 2011 requiring all employers subject to the NLRB jurisdictional standards to post an 11 x 17 notice form describing employee rights under the National Labor Relations Act. The new poster became available on October 1, 2011.

 

More Reasons To Be Careful About Social Media

As highlighted here previously, social media policies can easily violate federal labor laws. When the National Labor Relations Board filed a complaint against American Medical Response (“AMR”) of Connecticut in October 2010 we were all hoping for clarity (at least from the current board). The complaint charged that AMR had illegally terminated an ambulance service employee who […]